Solstice Sol Invictus news – screenings across the globe

 

 

Very excited and proud to say that Solstice Sol Invictus (a poetry film centred on light, hope, faith – regeneration and solar time) will be in the welcoming and richly varied online arts festival At the Fringe, Tranas, Sweden, available from the 9th­–18th October online – see

https://www.atthefringe.org/film-2020.  They say ‘The whole selection has been divided in two halves. In the evenings of the 10th and 11th of October, there will be two online “openings” for each of them, in which the selection will be presented and the films will be made accessible to the virtual public.’ Many many thanks to Laura Bianco at Spegel film and the team organizing the festival.  I shall certainly be watching, but wishing I was there!

I am also really honoured to say it has also been selected for the Film and Video Poetry Symposium in South Pasadena, West Coast USA, which will run from November to December 2020.  There will be three venues: an outdoor venue, an online programme and a selection on view in an art gallery. Sounds a nicely balanced format. We will find out more very soon! Again, I would like to believe I could travel across the world to be there … In the meantime, you can follow the Film and Video Poetry Society at:

https://www.facebook.com/FVPSociety

https://www.instagram.com/FVPSociety

SYNOPSIS

As the unconquered sun rises from the winter solstice, it also descends from the summer solstice to winter again; moving through two parallel equinoxes.  The first four verses are by Sarah Tremlett and the second four as a response, by Lucy English. This poetry film, including the voice of poetry film-maker Helmie Stil, and experimenting with light and time, was made for The Book of Hours poetry film project by Lucy English. The choice of the footage was partly influenced, I see now, by my interest in early surrealist images of nature, for example: Black Sun 1927–8 by German artist Max Ernst (1891–1976), is one that stands out, or Ambassador of Autumn (1922) by Swiss-German artist Paul Klee (1879–1940).

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